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Male Managers Push Harder to Reward Male Employees Than Female

Men compete like tigers for jobs, right? But a new study has found that women do the exact opposite when it comes to their employees, according to newswise.com. Female managers are equally competent when helping their all employees find new jobs, even sometimes are advocates for them.


Cristian Deszö and two co-authors at the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business have shown that women in group or team settings would ramp up their advocacy when working on behalf of others, becoming as competitive as men in that context, the website reports.


In a series of experiments in a simulated organizational setting with online workers, esearchers discovered that, when rewards exist for protégés, "female managers would become more competitive, regardless of whether they’re advocating for a man or a woman," says newswise.


In a series of experiments in a simulated organizational setting with online workers, they found that when rewards accrue to protégés, female managers would become more competitive, regardless of whether they’re advocating for a man or a woman.

“In essence, these results suggest that female managers are effective sponsors: they are willing to go to bat for their protégés at levels similar to those of their male colleagues,” newswise quotes Desző. “And that is not because male managers become less competitive when the rewards accrue to their protégés, it is because female managers are more competitive.”

However, even though male managers’ competitiveness remains essentially unchanged when rewards would accrue to protégés, they were much more competitive when the protégés were male. That disparity, Desző said, was notable – and closer examination revealed something else as well.

The fascinating conclusion of this study was that male managers may perpetuate gender disparities through their decision of who to compete for.




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